FREE hotINK at NYU

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I'm ready for my closeup

Bobcat

Mr. Demille....

One of the benefits of graduating from New York University is that you are one in a million…literally.  Since there are so many of you/us it stands to reason that some of you/us will eventually reap the rewards of being part of your/our large community of graduates.  One of those such events where you/we can bask in the collective glory of our association is the hotINK festival at the Tisch School of the Arts.  Though hotINK includes NYU alums as playwrights, directors, actors and audience members, the festival has extended far beyond NYU’s campus. Starting this weekend talented types will participate in staged readings of what’s new, hot and upcoming in live theatre from all over the globe. In the short eight years in existence, hotINK has presented cutting-edge work featuring playwrights from Morrocco to Austria and fostered numerous international collaborations.

From Saturday January 23rd to Sunday, January 31st check out this years’ selections that cover the gamut of topics including a 1982 single actor’s sexual escapades to a tale of two women’s suffering and resilience in the terror of Soviet Estonia.  Best of all you get this glimpse into the future of theatre for FREE.  But you must reserve tickets online.
Go to www.hotink.org for more information or http://www.smarttix.com/show.aspx?showcode=HOTI to make a reservation.

hotInk Festival
721 Broadway
January 23rd – 31st
www.hotink.org

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About the author

Christine Witmer - Sparing Stringer

Christine was born and raised in the land of the Pilgrims, Plymouth, Massachusetts. She turned in her buckled shoes when she moved to NYC to attend NYU. From that esteemed University she received her BFA in theatre as well as a Master’s Degree in Performance Studies in 2004. Now an actor, writer and broke ass day-jobber, Christine juggles her many personas with the elegance of a red panda…. specifically the one in the Prospect Park Zoo . . . soooooo cute! She can be found most often in her own habitat on the Northside of Williamsburg, Brooklyn.