Election 2010 – Meet the Candidates: Rod McLeod, Superior Court Judge, Seat No.6

It’s hard enough keeping up with one’s day to day nonsense in the great city of San Francisco, so when it comes time to cast your vote, outside of the inane commercials produced for high-profile candidates, it can be hard to find out anything about anyone else.

By no means hard-hitting interviews, I thought I’d ask various candidates 20 questions to give you an idea of what makes them tick, or if they tick at all. Now you’ll have one less excuse for being a moron and not voting.

Next…


Name: Roderick A. McLeod
Profession: Attorney
Office: Judge of the Superior Court, Seat No.6 (June 8 Election)
Age: 61
Hometown: Manila, Phillipines; San Francisco, California

Mr. McLeod answers our little questionnaire from his office at the Trial Practice Group of Jones Day.

Stephen Torres: So, Rod, where do you live?  If, in the city which neighbourhood?

Roderick McLeod: I live in Noe Valley.

ST: Okay, so what’s your favourite neighbourhood hangout?
RMcL- Trying to remember the name, it’s an Italian restaurant in Noe Valley…I believe it’s Lupa…It’s one of the best Italian restaurants in the city.

ST: Why are you running?
RMcL: After twenty years in private practice, I think I’m ready to judge.

ST: What’s the biggest issue in SF to you?
RMcL: I will say that I think the biggest issue in San Francisco is getting its economic house in order….so we can continue to provide quality of life and services that San Franciscans want.

ST: What the hell should be done about Muni/ BART?
RMcL: I think that they need to look at the issues of expense and see how they can generate new revenue.

ST: Foot, bike, PT, or car?
RMcL: A combination.  Everything except the bike.
My wife and I, for example, we love to take urban walks. You know, from our house in Noe Valley, we walk down 24th Street to the Mission, walk down to 16th Street, come back on Valencia or Dolores Park. Nice urban walks.

ST: What is your favourite cheap restaurant in town?
RMcL: ..would probably be (Henry’s) Hunan on Sacramento Street.

ST: What is your favourite cheap bar?
RMcL: Uh, I’m not much of a bar guy (laughs.)

ST: That’s fair. So, what’s your poison?
RMcL: Well, I love wine.

ST: Legalize pot?
RMcL: Yeah, I can’t answer that.

ST: Legalize prostitution?
RMcL: I can’t answer that.

ST: What are the best and worst parts about living in SF?
RMcL: The best part is the diversity of its population.  The worst part, I think, is that we don’t hear enough voices from the different diverse parts of the population in the political process.

ST: Definitely.  How long do you think before only rich people can live here?
RMcL: Oh, I think it’s going to be a long time.  We have so much space I this city and the cost of living- it’s gonna be like New York. Not only just rich people live in New York.

ST: Is the situation with the homeless in the city going to get better or worse?
RMcL: I think it’s probably going to get worse.

ST: Is our state/ country doomed?
RMcL: No, we have problems, but we’re not doomed by any chance.

ST: Mexico- important ally/ scary neighbour?
RMcL: Important ally.

ST: President Obama- good job/ bad job?
RMcL: So far, middlin’ to poor.

ST: Queer marriage- yay or nay?
RMcL: I can’t answer that directly, but I can say that I believe everyone should have equal rights.

ST: All right. Tell me a secret.
RMcL: A secret…(laughs.) It wouldn’t be a secret anymore.

ST: What would you like our readers to know about you?
RMcL: I am the only candidate that is not accepting campaign contributions.
ST: Wow. That’s impressive.  Well, thanks again Rod and good luck.

Candidate McLeod also wanted to ask our readers what they thought about electing judges to the Superior Court.  Should it be an office that one can be elected to, or should it be strictly appointed?  Well, public, what say ye?

Share This Page

About the author

Stephen Torres - Threadbare-Fact Finder

Stephen's early years were spent in a boxcar overlooking downtown Los Angeles. From there he moved around the state with his family before settling under the warm blanket of smog that covers suburban Southern California. Moving around led to his inabilty to stay in one place for very long, but San Francisco has been reeling him back in with its siren song since 1999. By trade he pours booze, but likes to think he can write and does so occasionally for people like the SF Bay Guardian. He also likes to enoy time spent in old eateries, bars and businesses that, by most standards, would have been condemned a long time ago.