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Porn Site Gets Thousands Of New Followers Thanks To Ted Cruz Screw-Up

 

The late-night porn-jacking habits of anti-pornography GOP senator Ted Cruz have entered the national conversation, as the pompous “family values” bullshit-spewing rube clicked ‘Like’ on a pornographic tweet and breathed beautiful life into late-night Twitter like it was “covfefe” all over again.

He also breathed life into the pornographic Twitter account in question. That porn account called @SexuallPosts (VERY NSFW! And not it’s even spelled right!) has gained roughly 15,000 new followers in the 12 hours since Cruz’ fuck-up. In an exclusive statement to BrokeAssStuart.com, the owner of the @SexuallPosts Twitter account said, “I’ve gained about 15k followers since last night (:”

 

@SexuallPosts is not even a real porn site, it’s just a Twitter account that reposts other content. A gentlemen pays for his porn, Senator Cruz. You can afford it — you have argued cases before the United States Supreme Court, you are a sitting U.S. Senator, you are the motherfucking One Percent. Why are you reduced to stealing free porn? It is beneath the dignity of a United States Senator to do so.

Hey, I’m not kink-shaming Ted Cruz. I’m shaming him for being a hypocrite and an asshole,  I’m shaming him because he still denies he looked at the porn, and I’m shaming him because he sex-shames other people with his Christian conservative bullshit.  

 

Do you want to see the porn that Ted Cruz liked? It is not actually that good! But here you go.

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Joe Kukura- Millionaire in Training

Joe Kukura- Millionaire in Training

Joe Kukura is a two-bit marketing writer who excels at the homoerotic double-entendre. He is training to run a full marathon completely drunk and high, and his work has appeared in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal on days when their editors made particularly curious decisions.