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$7.00 7 Days a Week: Urban Tavern Puts Out a Lunctime Lure for Fall

Just because you have moths flitting out of your pockets doesn’t mean you’ve been relegated to buffets, taquerias and the ilk if you’re dining out.

Like our wise Stu points out numerous times in his guide, San Francisco can be a beggars paradise of quality delectables if you play your cards right.  (The free food section alone is indispensable, P.s.)

Slashing menu prices is a sure fire way to get people in the door, especially when it come to upscale joints and keeping tables turning during weekday lunch shifts

Hence we have our newest offering to the thrifty gourmands of the city courtesy of Urban Tavern.  At $7.00, their Fall Lunch Special isn’t exactly bargain basement but you get fine dining quality for not much more than the cost of a lukewarm burrito.  The $7 plate changes each day, with Monday being a wild card (ooooh!) and having homey things like pozole on Sundays and spaghetti and meatballs on Tuesdays.

An added incentive, especially with the holiday season starting up and the prospect of weekend guests (and their gas guzzlers) dropping in, is that you have an affordable lunch option downtown that includes FIVE HOURS of free parking.  Now you can be dragged through every boutique and department store while your charges window shop ‘til their hearts content.

Urban Tavern
Lunch 11:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m.
333 O’Farrell Street (btw Taylor and Mason)
[Union Square]
SF

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About the author

Stephen Torres - Threadbare-Fact Finder

Stephen's early years were spent in a boxcar overlooking downtown Los Angeles. From there he moved around the state with his family before settling under the warm blanket of smog that covers suburban Southern California. Moving around led to his inabilty to stay in one place for very long, but San Francisco has been reeling him back in with its siren song since 1999. By trade he pours booze, but likes to think he can write and does so occasionally for people like the SF Bay Guardian. He also likes to enoy time spent in old eateries, bars and businesses that, by most standards, would have been condemned a long time ago.